2012 Exhibition, What is Land
Curated by EJ Lightman and Anne O'Callaghan

Mary Anne Barkhouse

Mary Anne Barkhouse

For the ancient Maya, late December in 2012 will mark the end of their Long Count calendar. Hopi prophecy speaks of transition from the fourth world to the fifth, 'the great day of purification' by fire. The Mohawk seventh generation is already here, marking the time to restore stewardship of the earth to indigenous people.
(Image from previous work, Harvest, 2009)

Millie Chen

Millie Chen

During the course of one day, I will perch in the treetop of one of the oldest trees on the land of the Tree Museum, at the level of the forest canopy, recording points-of-view not usually available to humans.

Eve Egoyan

Eve Egoyan

Central to my installation is a strung piano harp, (the inside of a piano without the keys or hammers). My intention is to create a piano mobile where the motion of wind and water will activate the strings, gently plucking and brushing the harp.

Gareth Lichty

Gareth Lichty

Fieldmark is a new work commissioned by The Tree Museum and continues with Lichty's tradition of weaving brightly coloured plastic into large sculptures.

Alicia Marvan

Alicia Marvan

Centered around grieving, this multi-layered work taps into Mexican death folklore, particularly the belief that Monarch butterflies embody the deceased. The site's abundant milkweed (Monarch's food) serve as the main graphic element for the garment, constructed with landscaping fabric, milkweed seeds, and water-soluble fabric. The shelter is also constructed with water-soluble fabric, collapsing when hit by a motion-activated sprinkler (echoing life's fragility).

Anne O'Callaghan

Anne O'Callaghan

My practice incorporates a wide range of media, including installation works, sculptures, photography, and text. Since the 1990s, my work could be characterized by its focus on installations.

Warren Quigley

Warren Quigley

By creating a text-based work, and mounting small laser etched panels on dead trees, I will treat the Tree Museum as an "open book". Content for this "book" will be sourced from collected quotes, remembered conversations, and journal notes.

Johannes Zits

Johannes Zits

Strolling in the Tree Museum last fall, Johannes came upon a magnificent spruce tree. He imagined himself nestled high up in it, shedding his clothes and wrapping the tree with them. As the idea grew, he envisioned placing large bundles of clothes under its boughs. Clothing would be pulled from the piles to cover the trunk with this new attire. In his mind, he saw that eventually he would adorn the entire inner canopy with an arrangement of clothing.
(image from previous work, Ball, 2011)